Category Archives: Business

Leaders can turn creativity into a competitive advantage, says IDEO’s Tim Brown

Imagine starting off a conversation at your next meeting during World Creativity and Innovation Week, April 15 – 21 with these statements from a Tim Brown, IDEO CEO Harvard Business Review article from November 2016.

“All of our management practices need to be updated: how organizations are structured, how we deploy capital, how we interact and collaborate with broader networks, what tools and technology we embrace and deploy, what we measure, what markets we target, who we hire and how we lead. Of these, how we lead and the kind of culture we create are the essential starting points.

When our goal is efficiency, our concept of governance includes ensuring standardization, high levels of coordination, careful assessment of risk, and, of course, the elimination of waste. When we want to be creatively fit, governance looks quite different. It should be, and feel, more nurturing. It should focus on speed of learning and rigorous experimentation. It benefits from an attitude of abundance.

Nurturing a creatively competitive organization requires curiosity above all else. Asking the right questions is more important (and more difficult) than having the right answers. One of my favorite Victorian entrepreneurs, Isambard Kingdom Brunel, asked the seemingly ridiculous question, “How can I create the experience of floating over the English countryside?” in his quest to building the first large scale, long-distance railway service in England.”

More at:

See what you can do.

Resolving the Paradox of Group Creativity

What makes teams work better also makes them less creative.

Sourced through from:

A corporate philosophy that lets people know it’s OK to be creative is critical, as is leadership that promotes the notion that everyone’s creative contribution will be taken seriously. Given the importance of innovation in contemporary organizations, isn’t it time we all started taking creativity more seriously?Viva World Creativity and Innovation Week April 15-21!

See on Scoop.itCreativity and Learning Insights

Let Your Frontline Workers Be Creative

We know that creativity and innovation fuel new products, services, even strategies. But too many executives make the mistake of assuming creativity is just reserved for a certain department or just the white-collar knowledge-workers in their firms. New research shows how important it is for all employees to be creative, even if they’re not high up on the org chart.

Sourced through from:

Keep this article in your back-pocket as support for using World Creativity and Innovation Week April 15-21 to advance the creativity in your organization.


The Creative Power of Meeting Eyeball to Eyeball

The subtleties of in-person interaction are critical … to creativity. A team of researchers from two U.S. universities and three European universities studied interactions within several teams at the University of Cologne that were trying to find new methods of prediction and analysis in psychology, economics, computer science and other fields; independent raters judged the creativity and quality of the teams’ ideas.

Understanding group creativity is increasingly important as more organizational problem solving gets done by teams rather than individuals; when Oxford Economics asked major employers to name the skills they want most in employees, “co-creativity and brainstorming” ranked near the top.

Additionally….The main reason Google serves its employees gourmet food for free is to make sure they’ll go to the cafeterias, where they’ll meet randomly in person. Google even measures the time spent waiting in line; three to four minutes is optimal.

Sourced through from: Read this article.  Worth it!


Why Curious People Are Destined for the C-Suite

We all have the potential to be curious, given the right conditions. And curiosity leads to creativity.

”While curiosity has ignited numerous startup ventures, it also plays an important role at more established companies, where leaders are having to contend with disruptive change in the marketplace. “These days, a leader’s primary occupation must be to discover the future,” Panera Bread CEO Ron Shaich told me. It’s “a continual search,” Shaich says, requiring that today’s leader keep exploring new ideas—including ideas from other industries or even from outside the business world.

Advising business leaders to “be more curious” sounds simple enough, but it may require a change in leadership style. In many cases, managers and top executives have risen through the ranks by providing fixes and solutions, not by asking questions. And once they’ve attained a position of leadership, they may feel the need to project confident expertise.

To acknowledge uncertainty by wondering aloud and asking deep questions carries a risk: the leader may be perceived as lacking knowledge. In their book The Innovator’s DNA, authors Clayton Christensen, Hal Gregersen and Jeff Dyer observed that the curious, questioning leaders they studied seemed to overcome this risk because they had a rare blend of humility and confidence: They were humble enough to acknowledge to themselves that they didn’t have all the answers, and confident enough to be able to admit that in front of everyone else.

While we may tend to think of curiosity as a hardwired personality trait—meaning, one either is blessed with “a curious mind” or not—according to Ian Leslie, author of the book Curious, curiosity is actually “more of a state than a trait.” We all have the potential to be curious, given the right conditions.

Leslie notes that curiosity seems to bubble up when we are exposed to new information and then find ourselves wanting to know more. Hence, the would-be curious leader should endeavor to get “out of the bubble” when possible; to seek out new influences, ideas, and experiences that may fire up the desire to learn more and dig deeper.”

More at:

Samsung Implements Flexible Work Hours to Bolster Employee Creativity and Efficiency Just before WCIW

Flexible work schedules have always attracted employees as they can allow them to balance their work and home lives from a schedule that they can create.


The new implementation, beginning April 13,  allows much more freedom in coming and going, with a few restrictions, of course – first, the must work at least four hours per day between 6 am and 10 pm – secondly, they must meet a mandatory 40 hours per week.  An official PR person from Samsung said, “The new system that allows more independence and flexibility in choosing working hours is part of Samsung’s continued efforts to help each member work more efficiently and creatively under the slogan ‘Work Smart, Think Hard, Build Trust.’”

Two bouts of creativity boost Orbite Aluminae’s balance sheet

A company with no revenue that is building a state-of-the-art facility needs to be creative in what it offers the market. Investors have to buy into the concept and the belief that management has the has the wherewithal to implement the plan.”


Another discipline seeking creativity: finance.