Category Archives: Creative problem solving

Can one learn to be creative? New Straits Times Malaysia

By HAZLINA AZIZ
January 31, 2018 @ 9:31am

IN the next few years, more than three generations may be working side by side at the workplace. They are the Baby Boomers, Generation X, Generation Y (also known as millennials) and Generation Z.

Gen Z, who were born after 1995, are beginning to appear in the workplace. By next year, Gen Z is expected to represent more than 20 per cent of the workforce.

Growing up in a world where the Internet, social media and mobile technology have always existed, they will bring their new technology and big ideas with them. It can be a significant challenge to prepare for the clash of these four generations.

Many organisations are still struggling to analyse the challenge that millennials pose in the workplace.

But, how different will Gen Z really be? A digitally innate generation of students, Gen Z have access to more information than the generations before them. Growing up in the age of technology provides them with more outlets and digital tools for exploration and expression.

So, they are said to be more curious, innovative and open-minded than past generations.

While they should be more advanced in searching for information and figuring things out on their own, they also expect everything to be available at any time and with low barriers of access. With Gen Z starting university and the first batch graduating soon, are the schools preparing them for their future? Is higher education ready for them?

A study done by Adobe that provides insight into Malaysian Gen Z students shows that they are feeling unprepared for the problems the “real world” face today, and want greater focus on creativity and hands-on learning in the classroom.

The study, “Gen Z in the Classroom: Creating the Future”, surveyed 250 Gen Z students between the ages of 11 and 17, and 100 teachers in Malaysia.

A similar study was also conducted in five Asia-Pacific (Apac) countries — Australia, India, Thailand, China and Korea. For Malaysia, they found 97 per cent of students and 100 per cent of teachers — the highest rating among five other countries — see creativity as essential to students’ future success.

Malaysian Gen Z students also have mixed emotions when it comes to their future after they finish schools.

According to the study, they feel “excited” and “curious”, but at the same time “nervous” or “worried”. Some are concerned that schools have not properly prepared them for the real world.

They believe that there are a variety of careers that require creativity. Ninety six per cent of students from this study believe their future careers would involve creativity.

Both students and teachers alike agree that Gen Z learn best through hands-on experience and wish that there is more focus on creativity. Students feel that classes focusing on computers and technology hone their creativity and will best prepare them for their future.

Developing creative people is an aim that most in education share; there have been growing calls to nurture and teach creativity from an early age in schools and universities.

The World Economic Forum predicts that creativity will rise from the 10th most sought-after skill in 2015 to the third in 2020.

But, what is creativity? It can seem that creativity is a natural gift for those who are lucky, for instance, great artists, musicians or entrepreneurs. Can one learn to be creative? Can we prime the mind for creative ideas to emerge?

Research has shown that creativity is a skill that can be taught, practised and developed. With imagination, we can be wired to be creative. Creative thinkers in any discipline are those who can tackle complex problems and develop innovative solutions.

Of course, this does not mean that you can teach one to be a genius. The techniques of teaching creativity are not going to turn a student into Einstein or Picasso.

It is more about encouraging day-to-day creative thinking that can make a student, and then later, as an adult, more productive.

Many educators claim to value creativity, but they do not always prioritise it. In some parts of the world, teaching creativity is already a necessary part of an undergraduate experience.

The International Centre for Studies in Creativity at Buffalo State College in New York is the world’s first university department of its type.

The term “makerspace” in education — probably still new in Malaysia’s education scene — is also the buzzword now to refer to physical spaces that support learning and doing, in a way that redefines traditional schooling. It provides hands-on experiences and encourages creative ways for students to design, experiment, build and invent.

How can creativity be cultivated in the classroom? The way Gen Z students consume and learn today is very different from past generations, hence, educators in Malaysia need to provide the right environment, updated tools and creative outlets to bring out the best in their students and foster innovative problem-solving skills the future workforce will need.

Education systems should focus less on the reproduction of information and more on critical thinking and problem solving. There are multiple solutions to open-ended and complex problems, a situation that the students will face as they pursue future careers.

Encouraging divergent instead of convergent thinking leads to solving problems that do not have one correct answer.

However, it is important to remember that teaching creativity does not mean that we should throw out the textbooks and exams while encouraging children to let their minds wander rather than concentrate in the classroom.

Children should not be given free rein for their imagination to run wild at the cost of understanding a subject. In encouraging creativity, I believe if you want to think outside the box, you must fully understand what is inside the box first.

hazlina@nst.com.my

Hazlina Aziz left her teaching career more than 20 years ago to take on different challenges beyond the conventional classroom. She is NSTP’s education editor for English language content.

https://www.nst.com.my/opinion/columnists/2018/01/330504/can-one-learn-be-creative

Creative Problem Solving – a skill needed for the Future: Adobe Study

In preparation for World Creativity and Innovation Day, April 21, take a look at this infographic revealing research by Adobe. It shows the importance of Creative Problem Solving – of using new thinking to approach and solve challenges to make the world a better place and to make your place in the world better too.
Screen Shot 2018-01-26 at 6.34.20 PMScreen Shot 2018-01-26 at 6.35.00 PM

You can see the regional difference insights here.

What are three things you can do, or three people you can talk to about this  – to use creative problem-solving day-to-day?  It’s important.

Using Creativity in Problem Solving, what does that mean?

np_idea_516835_56C0D8.png

World Creativity and Innovation Day, April 21 has a purpose: to encourage people to use creativity in problem-solving to create a decent life for people on a sustainable planet.

np_problem_681889_56C0D8.pngWhat does that mean? How does one use creativity in problem-solving? How does one know if creativity has been used?

In a May 2017 post, I asked for input about this question.  Here’s one reply, from Dr. Fatou Lo Planchon, France/Senegal

Sustainable development is crucial for our society. Your initiative is a big step forward in this issue.The complex and multifaceted challenges associated with global change and sustainable development occur on various scales.

Achieving solutions to these challenges has fostered the multiplicity of decision making levels, and the plurality of financial and regulatory instruments. However the transition to proactive and sustainable solutions is still tricky because it implies various interacting factors and requires a holistic and creative mindset.

Adaptation and resilience to climate change, water and energy issues, to name a few, are primordial questions to answer.

Using creativity to solve these burning environmental issues means clarifying the issues at stake, involving a diversity of people, widening our perspectives, and stretching our thinking to shift paradigms and come to new ideas. To make this participative cross disciplinary collaboration happen, a climate that fosters idea exploration, trial and errors, and experimentations is needed.

Using creativity in problem solving means:

– Using a robust process to find new ideas, make better decisions, co-create and innovate.

– Combining periods of divergent and convergent thinking

– Deferring judgment, freewheeling, leapfrogging, focusing on a lot of ideas

As an environmental scientist, a doctor in climatology, and a creative facilitator, the role of creativity in solving environmental problems is a question I have to often answer, and keep on searching for new answers to.

Thank you, ​Dr. Planchon.

Feel free to add your comments here.

Wouldn’t it be great to have a tool available for people to use to review how they might have used creativity in problem-solving in the past?  My hunch is that many already do. Imagine everyone able to seize and use their creative power moving forward.

What does it mean to use creativity in problem solving? Have your say.

Greetings all! It was an honour and a privilege to meet with Ambassador I. Rhonda King, Permanent Representative to the United Nations from St. Vincent and the Grenadines last week, on Thursday, April 20, 2017, to discuss the upcoming resolution to include World Creativity and Innovation Day among the UN Days of Observance.  Ambassador King is the champion of this resolution.

Ambassador I. Rhoda King. Permanent Representative to the United Nations from St. Vincent and the Grenadines with Marci Segal, Founder, World Creativity and Innovation Day, April 21. 4/20/2017
Ambassador King is championing that all levels – government, public sector, and civil society –  use creativity in problem-solving to make the world a better place and to make our place in the world better too, to reach the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals.

[A fuller report on the journey to the United Nations will follow in the next few weeks.  Please use the comment section below to include the questions you have.]

 

What does it mean to use creativity in problem-solving?

Would you like to contribute to the understanding of what it means to use creativity in problem-solving?

I am preparing a document to submit to the UN describing what to expect when creativity is used in problem-solving at the government, private sector, and civil society, and welcome your voice, your additions.  You will, of course, be given credit for your contribution and will receive a copy of the document for your files.

Please keep submissions to 250 words or less, bullet form is fine, and say from which country you are writing.  Copy editing may take place. Depending on the breadth of contributions, a summary paragraph may result, summing up the themes brought forward.

Use this page for your submissions, deadline is May 7

What’s next?

Short term: I am on holiday for the next few weeks and look forward to compiling what you submit, beginning May 7, the deadline for your comments.

Longer term: Because attention to life on our planet is of prime importance, I urge you to review the Sustainable Development Goals and view each as an opportunity for creative problem-solving at home, at work, in your government, and to include these in your goals for #WCID2018 and #WCIW2018

  • What might be ways to align actions and use each as stimulation for creative problem-solving?
  • How might you combine what you are currently involved in with advancing these goals?
  • What are ways to collaborate with unlikely partners to make a difference?

Moving forward:

  • Your examples of applying creativity in problem-solving to meet the 2030 Sustainability Goals will inspire others to act in meaningful, responsible, wise and impactful ways to make a difference that makes a difference. Please keep a record of them.
  • Help is needed, your help, to keep conversations alive, to keep creative energy moving.
  • We are in for the times of our lives! Ask for what you need and want to build creative confidence, competence, capacity, comfort, and commitment to using our creativity (new ideas, new decisions, new actions, new outcomes) to make the world a better place and to make our place in the world better too.

With appreciation for your leadership,

Marci

 

Research Shows Walking Actually Improves Creative Ability. Here’s How

Do you ever get a really good idea and then unconsciously begin pacing back and forth? Do you ever notice how, when this happens, the great ideas just keep on flowing?

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.collective-evolution.com

Don’t know what to do for World Creativity and Innovation Week April 15 to 21? Why not just go for a walk?

See on Scoop.itCreativity and Learning Insights

What’s Missing from Science Education? Creativity.

If we’re going to inspire future generations of chemists and physicists, we have to restore the creative process in science education.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.parent.co

How important is it to teach the creative process in science?

The neuroscience of creativity

Unraveling the underlying neural mechanisms of human creativity is a tough knot to untie. Despite its difficulties, or perhaps because of them, neuroscientists are on the hunt.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.medicalnewstoday.com

Evolution has fostered and rewarded creativity. Creativity is as human as conversation.