Category Archives: creative process

Let’s unite in our creativeness April 15-21. 

With so much divisiveness in our world now, wouldn’t be nice if we could transcend our differences and unite in our creativeness if only for one week every year? This year?

We all possess a potential for the future; we are pregnant with the possibilities for tomorrow.  Wouldn’t it be cool to see in everyone the contribution they can make and give them the chance, the support, the encouragement to release their creative spirit, even if only for one week every year? This year?

Wouldn’t it be cool to see in everyone the contribution they can make and give them the chance, the support, the encouragement to release their creative spirit, even if only for one week every year? This year?

Yes, everyone.

Imagine

Imagine if leaders discussing important issues we spurred during this one week to say “It’s World Creativity and Innovation Week, so let’s put on our creative thinking caps to see what else we can consider, and the let us share our brand new thinking with our stakeholders and other interested parties.”

When the intended and other audiences hear the new thinking they respond by using an Angel’s Advocate approach, saying:

  1. What they like about it (even if they don’t – to stretch their thinking)
  2. What some future potentials might be (even if they don’t like the idea – to stretch their thinking)
  3. Their objections and concerns
  4. And then dialogue together with the idea proposers of ways to overcome obstacles, to change and/or strengthen, and/or replace the idea.

What if during this one week

…School children all over the world were given the same challenge to solve? Wouldn’t it be fascinating to see their unique solutions?

…Municipalities, states, provinces, counties, industries, associations all recognized creative achievements and supported their constituents and members in learning more and exploring their own creativeness?

We all have a capacity to generate new ideas, make new decisions, take new actions and create new outcomes in whatever field we are in, such as dentistry, architecture, culinary, stone masonry, dance, driving truck, forecasting, teaching, you name it. Creativity occurs in the arts and beyond.

Wouldn’t it be cool to unite in our shared creativeness for one week every year?

That week exists. It’s called World Creativity and Innovation Week (wciw).

It begins on Leonardo da Vinci’s birthday, April 15, and continues through to World Creativity and Innovation Day April 21, since 2001.

Please join in; unite in celebrating our creativeness.

Share your unique way of doing so here.

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The photos are from a WCIW event last year in Canmore, Alberta, Canada held at artsPlace. Butcher block paper was put on that wall and visitors were invited to ‘give a hand to Canmore’.  Each traced his/her hand on the paper using markers and filled the space with a wish for the future. The children particularly enjoyed this, as you can see in the selected photos.

Do you want innovation to proceed? Then pay attention to the people

Imagine your plans are less effective than you anticipated. There’s pressure to perform differently, successfully. Conditions have changed; time now to adapt or innovate.

SoftplaceYou want to overcome obstacles, use creativity, and creative thinking. You want to access imagination, dream up what could be next, chart a different course, engage interested parties, and marshall resources to achieve results.

You want new outcomes, new ideas, new decisions, new actions.

So, what’s the first thing you do? Perhaps go to experts, listen to what they say. Perhaps you survey others to see if they have the same challenge and how they handle it. Perhaps you listen to podcasts about changes and trends that affect how you operate.

You might call together a group of colleagues to brainstorm insights. You could use a design thinking or other creative problem-solving process to uncover missing gaps from which to gain an advantage. You might look for inefficiencies at the macro and micro levels. Whatever your process, you find something that could work. Brava!

Now, what if, after all your effort, your colleagues use critical thinking first, and say the solution won’t work. End of story. Then what? You might feel dejected, sad, hurt. You might decide you haven’t the courage to do it again, to submit new thinking to solve new problems. You might make up a story about why your ideas weren’t accepted, take it personally or blame others. Your behavior might change as a result in ways that impact your overall performance and attitude towards your organization, your boss, your teammates.

Innovation_ConversationWhat if instead, your colleagues respond to new ideas in ways that support your creative thinking? Innovation is really about the people involved and how they work together, with the intended audience. Innovation is about people.

One aspect of World Creativity and Innovation Week April 15 – 21 is to remember to apply new thinking to new thinking – to discuss and/or hold conversations about new ideas rather than to immediately criticize them.

Here’s a four-step process you can use with colleagues, friends, clients, suppliers, children and other people with whom you regularly interact during WCIW this year. Do this, and you will honor, encourage and help facilitate people’s creative thinking.

You can use the Angel’s Advocate approach:

  1. Affirm first – say what’s good about the idea (even if you don’t like it – stretch your thinking)
  2. Future potentials – say what some positive potentials might be for this idea in the long run (even if you don’t like it – stretch your thinking)
  3. Objections and obstacles – mention your concerns and the idea’s limitations
  4. Strengthen the relationship – in dialogue, talk about ways to overcome concerns, to strengthen or modify the solution, discuss how well this fits the challenge, and/or problem-solve the findings together.

Share how you are contributing to World Creativity and Innovation Week April 15-21, to help acknowledge, support and release creative energy worldwide.

Become more comfortable with change during WCIW2017

Change is uncomfortable, and change is all around.

WCIW was created to  open the door to help people actualize, use, their natural creativity  (for example combining two things which haven’t been mixed together before [in any field, not limited to art]). Creativity by nature, involves change, different, new.

Sometimes we have the opportunity to remain with the familiar; sometimes not.  With so much change on the horizon, wouldn’t it be great to become more comfortable with its discomfort?

One way to become comfortable with change is to initiate it, to do something differently than the norm.  We began a new diet in our house recently and with it came complaints, confusion, and curiosities about ways to make it work. Adapting to change is part of the creative process – and it takes energy.

If you are looking for a project for WCIW2017, consider challenging or changing one of your long time habits.  Perhaps find a new way to get to work, or express affection to someone in a different way.  Each of these counts as partner celebrations for WCIW.

This poem, by Sam Walter Foss was written in 1895. It shows how conformity and habits can be incrementally built.  Read it out loud.  Take note of the connections you make to your life and the habits you might have built up over the years.

calfpath

One day through the primeval wood
A calf walked home as good calves should;
But made a trail all bent askew,
A crooked trail as all calves do.
Since then three hundred years have fled,
And I infer the calf is dead.
But still he left behind his trail,
And there by hangs my moral tale.
The trail was taken up next day
By a lone dog that passed that way;
And then a wise bellwether sheep
Pursued the train o’er hill and glade
Through those old woods a path was made.

And many men wound in and out
And dodged and turned and bent about
And uttered words of righteous wrath
Because ’twas such a crooked path;
But still they followed – do not laugh-
The first migrations of that calf,
And through this winding woodway stalked
Because he wobbled when he walked.

The forest path became a lane
That bent and turned and turned again;
This crooked lane became a road,
Where many a poor horse with his load
Toiled on beneath the burning sun,
And traveled some three miles in one.
And thus a century and a half
They trod the footsteps of that calf.

The years passed on in swiftness fleet,
The road became a village street;
And thus, before men were aware,
A city’s crowded thoroughfare.
And soon the central street was this
Of a renowned metropolis;
And men two centuries and a half
Trod in the footsteps of that calf.

Each day a hundred thousand rout
Followed this zigzag calf about
And o’er his crooked journey went
The traffic of a continent.

A hundred thousand men were were led
By one calf near three centuries dead.
They followed still his crooked way,
And lost one hundred years a day;
For thus such reverence is lent
To well established precedent.

change-300x201

Inspiration for this post came by randomly re-reading pages  77-81 of The Magic of Your Mind by Sidney J. Parnes, Bearly Limited, 1981.  Sid was my professor at the International Center for Studies in Creativity where I began studying in 1977.

What’s Missing from Science Education? Creativity.

If we’re going to inspire future generations of chemists and physicists, we have to restore the creative process in science education.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.parent.co

How important is it to teach the creative process in science?