Category Archives: Culture

Leaders can turn creativity into a competitive advantage, says IDEO’s Tim Brown

Imagine starting off a conversation at your next meeting during World Creativity and Innovation Week, April 15 – 21 with these statements from a Tim Brown, IDEO CEO Harvard Business Review article from November 2016.

“All of our management practices need to be updated: how organizations are structured, how we deploy capital, how we interact and collaborate with broader networks, what tools and technology we embrace and deploy, what we measure, what markets we target, who we hire and how we lead. Of these, how we lead and the kind of culture we create are the essential starting points.

When our goal is efficiency, our concept of governance includes ensuring standardization, high levels of coordination, careful assessment of risk, and, of course, the elimination of waste. When we want to be creatively fit, governance looks quite different. It should be, and feel, more nurturing. It should focus on speed of learning and rigorous experimentation. It benefits from an attitude of abundance.

Nurturing a creatively competitive organization requires curiosity above all else. Asking the right questions is more important (and more difficult) than having the right answers. One of my favorite Victorian entrepreneurs, Isambard Kingdom Brunel, asked the seemingly ridiculous question, “How can I create the experience of floating over the English countryside?” in his quest to building the first large scale, long-distance railway service in England.”

More at: https://hbr.org/2016/11/leaders-can-turn-creativity-into-a-competitive-advantage

See what you can do.

Happy 40th Anniversary to Why Man Creates. Creativity Principles Learned.

Leading up to the 90th Academy Awards Ceremony is a great time to honour the 1968 winner of the documentary short subject – Why Man Creates.

4BF6C08C-EEF5-41ED-AA9F-C2BE7A88FBF1We watched Why Man Creates every semester when I was an undergraduate and graduate student at the International Center for Studies in Creativity at Buffalo State College; from September 1977 through to December 1983.

Students and faculty at the Center quoted lines from the film because it was shown with such regularity, ‘I’m a bug, I’m a germ, I’m a bug, I’m a germ.  Ha – Louis Pasteur, I’m not a bug I’m not a germ.’

Creativity Principle: Look beyond the obvious

Every semester when our professor, Dr. Ruth Noller, showed it, I’d moan.

“I’ve seen it already,” I’d say.

“Then find something new in the film,” Ruth replied; like clockwork, every semester.

And so I did.  Ruth modeled an important principle you can use to fashion your WCID and WCIW celebrations. I learned to look beyond the obvious, to dig deeper, to see new things in the old – skills I use to this day.

Creativity Principle: Harsh immediate judgments are like a shot in the gut

One scene, in particular, stood out. An artist, who, in creating a sculpture, experiences an insight of grand proportions. He adds this new idea to his artwork and then, puts the sculpture on show.

We see a crowd gathered, commenting on this piece of art. Each utterance is a criticism. “It’s unAmerican.” I can’t say what I think because I’m from Nebraska, and you know what we are like.” “It will never fly Orville.”

We see the artist dressed like an American cowboy, receiving the comments as if each is a bullet. With each comment, he buckles over as if hit in the gut.

This scene profoundly moved me. Still does. Every time I hear an immediate ‘no’ to a new idea, it feels like a shot to the gut. From that I generalized this must be how others feel with rejection, immediate harsh criticism to their new thinking, that, in turn, discourages them from using their creative imagination and contributing new and different ideas, thinking, or potential solutions.

Wouldn’t it be great for people to inquire about new ideas rather than judge them harshly and critically upon first learning of them?  That’s one of my wishes for World Creativity and Innovation Day, April 21, that the portal for considering new ideas opens wider to enable free use of imagination applied to create a decent life for all on a sustainable planet.

Prepare for World Creativity and Innovation Day, April 21: An Invitation

I invite you to take a step back in history and to participate in the worldview of the times. Watch the 1968 film. Highlight your connections and insights in the comments section.

What principles emerge for you?

It’ll be interesting to see the meanings we make today.

Why Man Creates

Cheers!

Marci

What does Creativity Look Like in Different Cultures?

Overlaps of creativity beliefs that exist in different cultures are explored in this easy-to-read research paper.

World Creativity and Innovation Week April 15 – 21 is open to all. Remember to add April 15-21, World Creativity and Innovation Week to your planning calendar for 2017.

 

 

David Bowie, RIP

David Bowie changed culture using his creativity. Watch this 3-minute 1993 video to hear David Bowie talk of his creative process. Do you think it is the same as yours? Different? What is your guess?

Many celebrities recognize Bowie’s influence on their work. Madonna, Lady Gaga, and Jay Z are a few examples. In the field, we call culture changing creativity Big C creativity.  Day-to-day creativity, the kind we might use let’s say in the kitchen or the garden  is called  Small C creativity. Do you think the processes for Big C and Little C creativity can be the same?

This simple exercise can be used during World Creativity and Innovation Week April 15 – 21 to hold conversations you might not otherwise have.

Screen shot via TODAY
Screen shot via TODAY

 

Creative Literacy is the Answer – Mattymatt

Let me guess, you have a friend that isn’t creative, right? Let me take another guess, most people you encounter—maybe even yourself—don’t consider themselves creative. Most people are so quick to self-diagnose themselves as not creative.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: mattymatt.co

See on Scoop.itCreativity and Learning Insights

The Creative Museum – MuseumNext

4b288638-557c-485f-ae5c-b221945b90a3Here’s a creative museum activity in the Uk during World Creativity and Innovation Week April 15-21, 2016.

 

THE CREATIVE MUSEUM
18 APR 2016
16:00 – 18:00
CHESTER BEATTY LIBRARY, DUBLIN CASTLE
THE CREATIVE MUSEUM

In collaboration with a range of local partners, museums professionals and MuseumNext participants, the Creative Museum Project and the Chester Beatty Library will stage a high-paced, interactive and fun event about creativity and maker culture in museums.

In a relaxed, open environment, participants will be treated to a curated and highly interactive programme of lightning talks, fast workshops, and social mingling.

Contributors to the programme include:

Jo Ann Sunderland Bowe – Heritec
Jasper Visser – Inspired by Coffee
Jenny Siung – Chester Beatty Library
Ian Brunswick – Science Gallery
The topic: creativity, makers, and museums

Museums are often viewed as dead spaces. Yet museums contain incredible collections and inspire creativity, learning, and curiosity. How can museums tap into the creativity of their communities, maker culture and – ultimately – their own creativity, to face their various challenges and be better institutions? The event will present various perspectives on these questions, showcase best practices and invite participants to explore their own creativity.

 

Let Your Frontline Workers Be Creative

We know that creativity and innovation fuel new products, services, even strategies. But too many executives make the mistake of assuming creativity is just reserved for a certain department or just the white-collar knowledge-workers in their firms. New research shows how important it is for all employees to be creative, even if they’re not high up on the org chart.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: hbr.org

Keep this article in your back-pocket as support for using World Creativity and Innovation Week April 15-21 to advance the creativity in your organization.