Tag Archives: Climate for creativity

Why Curious People Are Destined for the C-Suite

We all have the potential to be curious, given the right conditions. And curiosity leads to creativity.

”While curiosity has ignited numerous startup ventures, it also plays an important role at more established companies, where leaders are having to contend with disruptive change in the marketplace. “These days, a leader’s primary occupation must be to discover the future,” Panera Bread CEO Ron Shaich told me. It’s “a continual search,” Shaich says, requiring that today’s leader keep exploring new ideas—including ideas from other industries or even from outside the business world.

Advising business leaders to “be more curious” sounds simple enough, but it may require a change in leadership style. In many cases, managers and top executives have risen through the ranks by providing fixes and solutions, not by asking questions. And once they’ve attained a position of leadership, they may feel the need to project confident expertise.

To acknowledge uncertainty by wondering aloud and asking deep questions carries a risk: the leader may be perceived as lacking knowledge. In their book The Innovator’s DNA, authors Clayton Christensen, Hal Gregersen and Jeff Dyer observed that the curious, questioning leaders they studied seemed to overcome this risk because they had a rare blend of humility and confidence: They were humble enough to acknowledge to themselves that they didn’t have all the answers, and confident enough to be able to admit that in front of everyone else.

While we may tend to think of curiosity as a hardwired personality trait—meaning, one either is blessed with “a curious mind” or not—according to Ian Leslie, author of the book Curious, curiosity is actually “more of a state than a trait.” We all have the potential to be curious, given the right conditions.

Leslie notes that curiosity seems to bubble up when we are exposed to new information and then find ourselves wanting to know more. Hence, the would-be curious leader should endeavor to get “out of the bubble” when possible; to seek out new influences, ideas, and experiences that may fire up the desire to learn more and dig deeper.”

More at: hbr.org

The Companies Where Millennials Want to Work the Most

If you want to attract the largest generation in history to work at your company, you’re going to have to give them two things: a sense of purpose and the ability to innovate.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.bloomberg.com

Imagine capturing that spirit during World Creativity and Innovation Week April 15 – 21.

Insights into Your Creativity – Life in a Day

There’s a great opportunity to take part in a global creativity event and plant idea seeds for your World Creativity and Innovation Week celebrations April 15 – 21, happening in nine months. How serendipitous that this door is opening now, inviting you to use new ideas and make new decisions to give birth to an exciting new future, and ideas for WCIW.

Your Creativity

Pay attention to your reactions to the announcement to participate in a global experiment to gain tremendous insights into your response to a creative proposition.  If you say, no, that’s not for me, what does that mean?  If you say yes, you can ask yourself what that’s about too.  Are you more creative if you answer one way and not the other?

If you say no, consider what might happen if you say yes.  There’s no cost involved to imagine alternative futures and to stay open to new ideas.

Life in a Day

Life In A Day is a global experiment to create a user-generated feature film: a documentary, shot in a single day, by you. On 24 July, you have 24 hours to capture a glimpse of your life on camera. The most compelling and distinctive footage will be edited into an experimental documentary film, produced by Ridley Scott and directed by Kevin Macdonald.

If your video is included in the final film, you’ll be credited as a co-director and may be one of 20 contributors selected to attend the film’s world premiere at the 2011 Sundance Film Festival.

How this helps you to gain insight into yours and others’ creativity

  1. Scroll through the comments made for these clips on YouTube.  You’ll read negativity, doubt, apprehension, excitement, joy and curiosity, typical responses different people have to new ideas. Viewing them can prepare you for the reactions people might have for your paradigm ‘cracklings’.
  2. Notice your own reaction to the invitation to take part. The emotions you feel and the thoughts you think will clue you in to how and why people respond to your ideas they way they do.  Consider it.

There are great insights to be had about the nature of the human spirit in the face of change and opportunity, even when there is nothing to lose and something to gain from participating. Plus, there’s an added bonus of a potential payoff from others.

Get your cameras ready…

Sustaining the Human Spirit at the World Futures Conference

Off to the World Futures Conference in Boston for the next few days to learn and contribute to what’s happening in the future, this year’s theme: Sustainable Futures, Strategies and Technologies.

Sparked by the notion that the future really depends on the people who make it happen, we’re presenting two sessions to emphasize the importance of how people feel when they engaged in using new thinking to make new decisions. One is a pre-conference all day workshop, the other a concurrent conference session.

Making the Covert Overt: Strategies to Sustain the Creative Human Spirit in Futures Planning

During this pre-conference session Megan Mitchell and I will be making the case that affect or emotion, influences people’s involvement in futures planning workshops and will show a variety of techniques to show the effectiveness of using a framework developed by Chilean economist Manfred Max-Neef as a guide. The day long session provides:

  • Proven presentation and engagement techniques to foster improved futures thinking and foresight by honoring the human spirit
  • Strategies, tools and tips for unleashing new pathways to knowledge

World Creativity and Innovation Week: Sustaining the Global Human Spirit

WCIW logoThis concurrent session provides insights into ways creativity can be actualized annually for the benefit of creating better futures.  World Creativity and Innovation Week April 15 – 21 (WCIW) began in Canada in 2001 and is celebrated in more than 43 countries. It’s grass roots, word-of-mouth, volunteer and it continues to grow.

Tom McMillian, Megan Mitchell and I  present the rationale behind the celebration, its history and share examples of its positive influence citing examples from

  • corporate (Pfizer Consumer Health, Disney, PHD Canada)
  • public sector (Ontario government)
  • education (International Center for Studies in Creativity, American University)
  • community (Bangkok, Thailand; Buenos Ares, Argentina; Brussels, Belgium; Sydney, Australia)

celebrations from around the globe. Tom and Megan were heavily involved in Pfizer Consumer Health’s global celebration in 2006.

WCIW was created to encourage people to use their creativity to make the world a better place and to make their place in the world better too, without causing harm.

Our handout is attached – it highlights suggestions for planning ways to celebrate, how to get involved, and gives contact information.

WCIW handout FINAL

Looking forward to blogging news from the future…